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  • created 01/30/15

Figgy Idol

Like American Idol, only our contestants write. We are a multi-round, short story writing competition held annually-ish here on Figment. Anyone with any kind of experience is free to sign-up.

Discussion began on 05/15/2017 Lock This discussion is locked

ROUND SEVEN: Quiet Like The Snow

  • Img_20170630_162958_311 Icon-founder Ellie Williams

    Without descriptions, your story is a bunch of stick figures on a blank canvas. Not very exciting, is it? It is imperative as a writer to be able to convey the images you see in your head. Your readers want to see the movie playing in your head that inspired you enough that the urge to jot it down overcame you. Lacking this ability will leave your stories feeling unfinished and uninteresting. Give your characters scenery to interact with. Fully immerse us in your world and bring your story to life.

    ROUND SEVEN: Quiet Like The Snow

    Have you ever been at a restaurant or another public place and watched two people interact with one another? You can’t hear what they’re saying, but you can almost figure out what they’re talking about based on their actions. And if you can’t, well, you make up a plausible story to go along with what you see. You do if you’re me, anyway. That is what this prompt is based upon.

    For this round, you must write us a story completely devoid of dialogue. I don’t want to see a single quotation mark or “he/she said” in ANY of your stories. But it’s not that simple. A conversation must go on between two of your characters. This can be an argument, a casual discussion, a proposal, a confession--anything! Additionally, the conversation must come to a natural conclusion by the end of your story. If it’s an argument you’re portraying, it must be resolved. (That doesn’t mean it has to end amicably, though.) If it’s a confession, we want to see the outcome of it. (How did the person receiving the news react to it--positively or negatively?) Basically, the story cannot end in the middle of the conversation. Don’t leave us hanging, please.

    In short, you need to write us a story that is the complete OPPOSITE of what you gave us for round five. You don’t have to use the same characters or the same plotline as you did then, however. You can, but I would encourage you to stretch your fingers a bit more and come up with something truly creative.

    I also challenge you to write from the perspective of one of the characters involved in the conversation, but I am not going to force that upon you. You may narrate the story through a third party who is innocently observing the interaction if that is where inspiration leads you. Everything that occurs between the two characters, however, must be portrayed through descriptions. If you are unaware of the phrase “show, don’t tell,” this would be the prompt to become familiar with it.

    Since this is a description challenge, we want to be fully immersed into your story. Describe the hell out of what you see in your head since we can’t be there with you. Make note of more than just what can be seen, though. Description is more than just a visionary adventure. If you write from an outside party, be sure to incorporate their thoughts and their reaction to the conversation they’re witnessing. They have emotions, too!

    If you find yourself stuck or unknowing of where to start, I fortuitously stumbled across two short stories I wrote a few years back that fit perfectly into this prompt. I posted them on Figment for you all to look at if you want or need to; they can be found here. Remember that these are just examples to help get you thinking. You do not have to follow my formulae and can come up with your own way to approach this prompt if you so wish to.

    Your stories can be any length up to 6,000 words and take place in any realm, place, or time. The deadline for this round is Wednesday, May 24th at 11:59PM MST. All content will be accepted. However, please don’t go too heavy on the gory, violent, or erotic details. Do not submit your links in this discussion until your story is ready to be judged (but be sure to post it before the deadline). No late entries will be accepted, and we do not offer deadline extensions. Any contestant who does not submit an entry by the deadline will be disqualified. One contestant will be eliminated this round.

    If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask them. One of us judges will respond as soon as we can.

    FEEDBACK GROUPS

    Becka
    1.
    2.

    Ellie
    1. Elizabeth
    2. Hazel Gatoya

    Grant
    1. Adrianne Etheridge
    2.

    Jo
    1.
    2.

    Tilda
    1. Stephanie S
    2.


    CONTESTANTS

     

  • Profile2 Icon-member Stephanie S

    I'd like to work with Tilda, please.

  • Cpap8_wi_400x400 Icon-member E. Anderson

    May I please work with Ellie?

  • Profile Icon-member Hazel Gatoya

    Holy carp, this is going to be difficult. May I work with Ellie, please?

  • Image Icon-member Adrianne Etheridge

    I'd like to work with Grant this round.

  • Screen shot 2017-01-13 at 1.28.00 pm Icon-member J.A. [Post-Figgy Idol Hiatus]

    I'd love to work with Grant. 

  • Profile2 Icon-member Stephanie S

    I have a pretty particular question. I know we aren't supposed to have a single line of dialogue in the story, but would it be alright if my characters communicated with hand fans? It would be set in the Victorian age, where certain fan gestures meant different responses. I was thinking of writing it from an outsider's point of view, so they'd be reacting to those fan gestures and piecing together what they mean. For example, some of the gestures mean "yes" or "no"; would I be allowed to explain that in the story? I understand if this isn't permitted, however. 

  • Img_20170364_022218[1] Icon-member Sekerya Mackenzie

    Can I please work with Becka this round? Thanks :)

  • Img_20170630_162958_311 Icon-founder Ellie Williams

    @Stephanie, that would be fine. =]

  • Img_20170364_022218[1] Icon-member Sekerya Mackenzie

    I understand as this round's prompt, the scene should be the primary focus, but I was wondering if there cannot be more to the story? Like, could the scene be prominent and more so pushing the plot over being the only part of my story? I'm not sure if that makes sense. Thank you in advance.

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